Is Steve Martin racist?
King Tut: The Atlantic

DUMMY AGAINST THE WALL.
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彼女は足の一本をシンクに引っ張り、ドアのハンドルを口に入れ、息を温めて潤いを与え、唇を猫から引き離してから、まず穏やかに、そして次に浅く押して、ハンドルを回し始めた。 良いものの最初の波が彼女を過ぎ去
“Gunter glieben glauten globen.”
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"Okay, okay, but just for a little."
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«Она подняла одну ногу на раковину и держала ручку дверцы в рот, согревая и смачивая ее своим дыхани
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“Gunter glieben glauten

At Reed College, a small liberal-arts school in Portland, Oregon, a 39-year-old Saturday Night Live skit recently caused an uproar over cultural appropriation. In the classic Steve Martin skit, he performs a goofy song, “King Tut,” meant to satirize a Tutankhamun exhibit touring the U.S. and to criticize the commercialization of Egyptian culture. You could say that his critique is weak; that his humor is lame; that his dance moves are unintentionally offensive or downright racist. All of that, and more, was debated in a humanities course at Reed.

But many students found the video so egregious that they opposed its very presence in class. “That’s like somebody … making a song just littered with the n-word everywhere,” a member of Reedies Against Racism (RAR) told the student newspaper when asked about Martin’s performance. She told me more: The Egyptian garb of the backup dancers and singers—many of whom are African American—“is racist as well. The gold face of the saxophone dancer leaving its tomb is an exhibition of blackface.”

Okay, okay, but just for a...

不过一辈子

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